First Sunday of Advent • Year C

The season of Advent challenges us to examine our lives for signs of sleep. St. Paul, in the second reading, tells us: “It is now the hour to wake from sleep….Let us cast off the deeds of darkness and put on the armor of light.” Advent encourages us to build into our lives a series of checks and balances, so that present routines don’t lull us into complacency, so that we don’t fool ourselves with a false sense of security.

Thirty-fourth Sunday of Ordinary Time • Year C

The letter to the Colossians continues to open out the nature of Christ’s kingship in some of the richest language of the New Testament. His intimacy with his Father makes it possible for us to claim in faith that every dimension of creation is organically interconnected with one another because Jesus is the means by which the Father created the universe of nature and humanity, and the world that transcends the sensual.

Thirty-third Sunday of Ordinary Time • Year C

Jesus does not ever sugar coat His message, but always gives it to us straight. Life is beautiful, but life is also hard. Human beings are created in the image and likeness of God, but not immortal on our own, nor invulnerable to the trials of this world.

Thirty-second Sunday of Ordinary Time • Year C

We cannot get rid of God no matter how hard we try in our sinfulness. And it is precisely because God wants us to be more and more the sacraments of God’s presence to others that God calls us little by little, rebuking and warning and reminding us, says Wisdom, so that we can turn to the merciful and compassionate God, whom Jesus, in the Gospel of Luke, proclaims as he enters into the house of Zacchaeus, the tax collector, who was lost, but Jesus found.

Thirty-first Sunday of Ordinary Time • Year C

We cannot get rid of God no matter how hard we try in our sinfulness. And it is precisely because God wants us to be more and more the sacraments of God’s presence to others that God calls us little by little, rebuking and warning and reminding us, says Wisdom, so that we can turn to the merciful and compassionate God, whom Jesus, in the Gospel of Luke, proclaims as he enters into the house of Zacchaeus, the tax collector, who was lost, but Jesus found.

Thirtieth Sunday of Ordinary Time • Year C

Today, we see the importance of the disposition of humility in prayer. The humble and honest prayer of the tax collector reveals his true self. His example serves as a reminder to us that with and in humility we are invited to begin and end all prayer. What other thoughts does this Gospel raise for us?

Twenty-ninth Sunday of Ordinary Time • Year C

What is our body language? What is our posture? What is our stance in life? What is it that we communicate? Are we closed off from one another, to each other’s voices, ideas, concerns? Do we listen to one another, or are we too busy looking the other way? Or are we open to each other, looking at each other in the eye?

Twenty-eighth Sunday of Ordinary Time • Year C

Naaman’s dignity is revealed with the healing waters of the Jordan. Likewise, the ten lepers were reunited with their family and community celebrating their dignity. Can we see a parallel meaning in our baptism? Washing may not have happened in a river, but it is an image of cleansing, an experience that celebrates our dignity.

Twenty-seventh Sunday of Ordinary Time • Year C

We see the impossible being done everyday by healthcare workers and laborers on farms and factories, by teachers finding ways to bring forth learning, by innovators and imagineers able to see possibilities never considered before. Without faith, so much remains impossible and untried. With faith, miracles happen because faith opens our eyes to the awe and wonder of what God has done and is doing in our midst.

Twenty-sixth Sunday of Ordinary Time • Year C

Our Catholic faith teaches us that there are two ways in which we can fall off the wagon – so to speak – on our pilgrimage through life. One is by the deliberate, conscious and willful choices we make to do harm, cause injury, inflict pain by word or thought or action. The other is more subtle, more hidden perhaps, more damaging in the long run – and that is the failure to do something positive where the opportunity presents itself.