Homilies

Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity • Year B

The revelation of this Mystery that the Church has received is one first mirrored to us, in and through Jesus. We hear in the Gospel, how Jesus tells his disciples, “I am with you always.” And just last week we celebrated Pentecost in which we mark that Jesus breathed upon the Church the Holy Spirit, pulling us into the very Mystery of this God Whom we celebrate, making us God’s children, as we heard in the second reading from Paul’s Letter to the Romans.

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Pentecost Sunday • Year B

The Seventh Sunday of Easter contains the prayer of hope that Christ proclaims on Good Friday: “Father forgive them, they know not what they are doing.” How do we imitate Christ’s Good Friday prayer? Such a prayer is the pathway to Peace that was given to disillusioned disciples when he breathed on them the gift of mercy. “Receive the Holy Spirit, whose sins you forgive are forgiven them, and whose sins you retain are retained.” Have we received and implemented the disciples’ gift to forgive, to love one another? Or do we choose to live in the darkness of anger which often migrates to hatred?

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Seventh Sunday of Easter • Year B

The Seventh Sunday of Easter contains the prayer of hope that Christ proclaims on Good Friday: “Father forgive them, they know not what they are doing.” How do we imitate Christ’s Good Friday prayer? Such a prayer is the pathway to Peace that was given to disillusioned disciples when he breathed on them the gift of mercy. “Receive the Holy Spirit, whose sins you forgive are forgiven them, and whose sins you retain are retained.” Have we received and implemented the disciples’ gift to forgive, to love one another? Or do we choose to live in the darkness of anger which often migrates to hatred?

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Sixth Sunday of Easter • Year B

. It begins with our weakness for instant gratification. Love and friendship have been devalued in many ways, lost in a torrent of words and images, trivialized, and emptied of moral concerns and responsibilities. Our media-matic gadgets carry a deluge of that stuff every day. It is all too easy to talk, sing or act in a manner that looks like friendship or love. People become intoxicated to the point of living the illusion without examining the reality in their own lives. And it becomes difficult to sort out the good from the false and harmful elements that pervade like weeds our love and friendships.

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Fifth Sunday of Easter • Year B

Today we hear about one of Saint Paul’s big challenges. After his conversion, a famous story itself, he had to overcome the understandable suspicion and fear of the disciples who did not trust him. At the same time, he had to evade capture and execution by those who considered him a traitor by becoming a disciple of Jesus. Now that was the proverbial “rock and a hard place!” Fortunately, it all worked out. They didn’t let fear and prejudice prevail over truth and faith. This is a good lesson for all times, including our own.

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Fourth Sunday of Easter • Year B

But Jesus gives us an example of a good shepherd. That is our call to relationship with Christ and through him, with the Father. The good shepherd commits to sacrifice for the sake of others, which of course we understand that Christ has done for us. But we are called to emulate that in our lives. St. Augustine, in his commentary on this gospel, would tell us, “whoever enters the sheepfold (the church), let them enter and preach the true Christ, and not only let him/her preach the true Christ, but also seek Christ’s glory, not their own. By seeking their own glory they have scattered Christ’s sheep instead of gathering them.” That is the challenge we are to consider as we reflect on today’s gospel.

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Friar walking with three college students through a college campus

The Legacy of

St. Augustine in the Catholic Church

Augustine was a thoughtful, empathetic, and loving servant of God. He valued community, welcomed others, and treated them the way they deserved to be treated. Augustine also laid the foundation for the Order of St. Augustine. The Order continues to explore ways to care for those in great need both in our Province work throughout Massachusetts, New Jersey, and surrounding states and in our greater missions throughout the world.

We invite you to continue to learn about St. Augustine, his life, and his teachings.

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